Mondelez CEO Irene Rosenfeld to Retire in November



We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

The global snack and candy company is known for brands like Oreo cookies and Ritz crackers.

Mondelez International CEO Irene Rosenfeld will retire in November, the company announced Aug. 2, 2017.

Mondelez International CEO Irene Rosenfeld will retire in November, bringing an end to her time at the helm of the $26 billion global snack and candy company known for brands like Oreo cookies and Ritz crackers, the company announced Wednesday.

She'll be replaced by Dirk Van de Put, who's currently president and CEO of Canada-based McCain Foods, a global frozen potato company.

As one of the relatively few female CEOs of a Fortune 500 company, Rosenfeld, 64, cut costs, overhauled the company's global supply chain network and worked to position Mondelez for growth in a changing food industry.

Rosenfeld became CEO of Kraft in 2006, orchestrated a hostile takeover of Cadbury in 2010 and then oversaw the spin-off of Kraft Foods, the North American grocery portion of the company, from the newly formed Mondelez.

Rosenfeld also attempted a $23 billion acquisition of Hershey last summer but ultimately failed. That tie-up made good strategic sense, Rosenfeld said in an interview Wednesday, but "it takes two to tango."

Here's what's next for the global brand.


What It Means for Mondelez That CEO Irene Rosenfeld Is Leaving

In this Market Foolery segment, host Chris Hill and Motley Fool Funds&apos Bill Barkerਊttempt to read the tea leaves around the departure of Mondelez&aposs (NASDAQ: MDLZ) longtime CEO. Her replacement is Dirk Van de Put, the head of privately heldꃊnadian frozen-foods player McCain Foods. The packaged-foods segment as a whole has been doing tepidly in the past few years, and even within that, Mondelez stock has underperformed. So what could Van de Put have in mind to shake things up and bring the company some adrenalin?

A full transcript follows the video.

10 stocks we like better than Mondelez InternationalWhen investing geniuses David and Tom Gardner have a stock tip, it can pay to listen. After all, the newsletter they have run for over a decade, Motley Fool Stock Advisor, has tripled the market.*

David and Tom just revealed what they believe are the 10 best stocks for investors to buy right now. and Mondelez International wasn&apost one of them! That&aposs right -- they think these 10 stocks are even better buys.

*Stock Advisor returns as of August 1, 2017

This podcast was recorded on Aug. 2, 2017.   

Chris Hill: Second-quarter results from Mondelez were overshadowed by the news thatꃎO Irene Rosenfeld is stepping down in November. She&aposs going to remain as਌hair of the company. Eleven years in the corner office for Irene Rosenfeld. It&aposs kind of interesting that Mondelez is bringing in an outsider, someone by the name of਍irk Van de Put, who&aposs਌oming over from McCain Foods. They&aposre਋ringing in an outsider, and that suggests to me that all is not well at the house of Oreo at Mondelez. If your thinking is "We need someਏresh perspective, and we&aposre going to bring in an outsider," I think that&aposs what this move telegraphs,ਊs opposed to "Everything&aposs been going so great for so long that we just need a top lieutenant to਌ome in and keep this steady ship afloat."

Bill Barker: It&aposs reasonably tough times in the packaged-food services sector, and Mondelez has not really escaped that and has not outperformed the competition. So I can see going in a new direction asꂾing one of the possible solutions, particularly over the last three years, it has not lived up to the competition. So you might be right about that. I haven&apost seen the details, and I&aposm sure they&aposre not saying anything like that,਋ut it&aposs been an underperforming stock for quite a long period of time. The house of Oreo, it&aposs a lot more than that. Maybe not to you.

Hill: It is the No. 1 cookie brand. I think --

Barker: Biscuit.

Hill: Biscuit?

Barker: Yeah, it&aposs in the biscuit division at Mondelez.

Hill: Maybe that&aposs part of their problem. You showed me a story earlier this morning online, and it was a still photograph of Irene Rosenfeld, and as you indicated, Mondelez has many brands under its umbrella, and the brand that was prominently featuredꂾhind Irene Rosenfeld was, in fact, Oreos. So that&aposs the one they&aposre most associated with.

Barker: Yeah. Certainly, it&aposs the one we talk about the most on this show, although Cadbury is probably a bigger part of the business, I believe. They&aposre the No. 1 or No. 2਌hocolate maker in every country,਎very major market in the world, except U.S. and China.

Hill: Is Hershey (NYSE: HSY) No.1 here in the States?

Barker: I believe Mars is No. 1.

Hill: Oh, yeah, that&aposs right.

Barker: I&aposm not entirely sure if it&aposs Mars or Hershey, but Mars possibly. I don&apost know about China, who&aposs No. 1. I know Hershey is not really competition around the rest of the world. It&aposs mostly Mars and�ury everywhere else.

Hill: So in terms of this new CEO coming in,ꂾyond looking at the cost structure in the Oreo division, which is, as we&aposve talked about before, incredibly bloated because they have way too many people working in the Oreo division, do you think that this new CEO is going to look to shed some of the brands that they have? Because that&aposs a strategy we&aposve seen from larger consumer-goods਌ompanies -- Procter & Gamble leaps to mind. But I&aposm thinking about the stock. They have some really strong brands under their umbrella. It&aposs kind of like whenਏord Motor had a record year in terms of sales and the stock went nowhere,ਊnd you could reasonably look at that and say, if you just sold the most vehicles you&aposve ever soldਊnd that&aposs not moving the stock, I&aposm not entirely sure what does. They have the No. 1 cookie brand. Do they need to start shedding some of these other under-performing brands in order to make this a stock worth owning?

Barker: Well,ꃎrtainly, getting rid of anything that&aposs not worth the investment makes sense. If you have new leadership coming in, they can look at things, and਎ven though there may be people who have been working on one specific brand for a long time, and you have a lot of entrenched interests, new eyes can come in and say, "Look,਌hiclets really aren&apost going to be worth doing for the next 50 years." I don&apost think Chiclets are in any danger, but that&aposs one of the many brands that they have. I don&apost know, when&aposs the last time you had some Chiclets?

Hill: I think I was a child. That&aposs how long ago it was.

Barker: Yeah. So I think the biggest brand introduction of late that they keep talking about is the Oreos brand chocolate that they&aposre selling now in the U.S., Oreos Milka, I guess. Have you ever heard of this?

Hill: No, never heard of this.

Barker: Let&aposs get you started on Oreos. You presented almost as fact that Oreos was this bloated division with way too many employees.

Hill: I&aposm waiting for proof that it&aposs not. Look, if you work in the Oreo division, you should be quaking in your boots that a new CEOਏrom a completely different company is going to be occupying the corner office,�use that&aposs one of the first things Dirk is going to do when he takes over. Like, "Show me the P&L on the Oreo਍ivision," because,ਊgain, it&aposs the No. 1 cookie in the world, and somehow this is a stock that&aposs gone nowhere for a year.

Barker: And your research into whether Oreos is a bloated division is going to grocery stores and getting angry at the number of choices of flavors that one can get with the Oreos brand now?

Hill: Exactly, way too many. Stop spending time and effort on these one-off insane flavor combinations. Just keep making the basic Oreos, the thin Oreos and Double Stuf. You can even talk me into the chocolate-filled ones as well. Butਏor crying out loud, stop with the Peeps. Just stop. Move on. You&aposve already got a hit. Move on to other divisions.

Barker: Was it Peeps, was that the straw that broke --

Hill: Yeah, Peeps was the straw that broke my back on that one.

Barker: And since then, you&aposre kind of inundated online with people researching these and sending them to Facebookਊnd the Twitter.

Hill: I appreciate them. I always appreciate the research.

Barker: Here&apossਊ little bit of anger for Chris Hill. Here&aposs a picture of some new insane Oreos਋rand.

Hill: It&aposs two things. One is, there&aposs no substitute for boots-on-the-ground research, so I always applaud that. Two, it signifies that I&aposm not the only one who thinks this way. It&aposs other people taking photos and tweeting them or posting them on Facebook and saying, "Oh my God, what are they doing over there?"

Barker: I don&apost know. if I were going to change something, I think I would change the name.

Hill: Of Oreos?

Barker: Mondelez.

Hill: Oh, yeah.

Barker: What is this?

Hill: Just਌hange it to Oreos. [laughs]

Barker: [laughs] But as a stock, it has under-performedਊny relevant period, most dramatically over the last year. Three, five, 10, 15 years against the S&P andਊgainst the confectioners it&aposs just not keeping up with the competition. They have a lot of well-known brands, and their playbook has been, "Let&aposs਎xtend those brands by combining Oreos with Peeps, or਌hips Ahoy with root beer flavor," or whatever they&aposre doing over there, and now Oreos Milka chocolate. So they&aposve acquired a few brands, and they paid outਊ bunch of dividends. That&aposs probably been aꂾtter use of their capital than some of the acquisitions. But I would agree with what appears to be the case that some new thinking is going to help.

Bill Barker has no position in any stocks mentioned. Chris Hill has no position in any stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends Facebook, Ford, and Twitter. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.


What It Means for Mondelez That CEO Irene Rosenfeld Is Leaving

In this Market Foolery segment, host Chris Hill and Motley Fool Funds&apos Bill Barkerਊttempt to read the tea leaves around the departure of Mondelez&aposs (NASDAQ: MDLZ) longtime CEO. Her replacement is Dirk Van de Put, the head of privately heldꃊnadian frozen-foods player McCain Foods. The packaged-foods segment as a whole has been doing tepidly in the past few years, and even within that, Mondelez stock has underperformed. So what could Van de Put have in mind to shake things up and bring the company some adrenalin?

A full transcript follows the video.

10 stocks we like better than Mondelez InternationalWhen investing geniuses David and Tom Gardner have a stock tip, it can pay to listen. After all, the newsletter they have run for over a decade, Motley Fool Stock Advisor, has tripled the market.*

David and Tom just revealed what they believe are the 10 best stocks for investors to buy right now. and Mondelez International wasn&apost one of them! That&aposs right -- they think these 10 stocks are even better buys.

*Stock Advisor returns as of August 1, 2017

This podcast was recorded on Aug. 2, 2017.   

Chris Hill: Second-quarter results from Mondelez were overshadowed by the news thatꃎO Irene Rosenfeld is stepping down in November. She&aposs going to remain as਌hair of the company. Eleven years in the corner office for Irene Rosenfeld. It&aposs kind of interesting that Mondelez is bringing in an outsider, someone by the name of਍irk Van de Put, who&aposs਌oming over from McCain Foods. They&aposre਋ringing in an outsider, and that suggests to me that all is not well at the house of Oreo at Mondelez. If your thinking is "We need someਏresh perspective, and we&aposre going to bring in an outsider," I think that&aposs what this move telegraphs,ਊs opposed to "Everything&aposs been going so great for so long that we just need a top lieutenant to਌ome in and keep this steady ship afloat."

Bill Barker: It&aposs reasonably tough times in the packaged-food services sector, and Mondelez has not really escaped that and has not outperformed the competition. So I can see going in a new direction asꂾing one of the possible solutions, particularly over the last three years, it has not lived up to the competition. So you might be right about that. I haven&apost seen the details, and I&aposm sure they&aposre not saying anything like that,਋ut it&aposs been an underperforming stock for quite a long period of time. The house of Oreo, it&aposs a lot more than that. Maybe not to you.

Hill: It is the No. 1 cookie brand. I think --

Barker: Biscuit.

Hill: Biscuit?

Barker: Yeah, it&aposs in the biscuit division at Mondelez.

Hill: Maybe that&aposs part of their problem. You showed me a story earlier this morning online, and it was a still photograph of Irene Rosenfeld, and as you indicated, Mondelez has many brands under its umbrella, and the brand that was prominently featuredꂾhind Irene Rosenfeld was, in fact, Oreos. So that&aposs the one they&aposre most associated with.

Barker: Yeah. Certainly, it&aposs the one we talk about the most on this show, although Cadbury is probably a bigger part of the business, I believe. They&aposre the No. 1 or No. 2਌hocolate maker in every country,਎very major market in the world, except U.S. and China.

Hill: Is Hershey (NYSE: HSY) No.1 here in the States?

Barker: I believe Mars is No. 1.

Hill: Oh, yeah, that&aposs right.

Barker: I&aposm not entirely sure if it&aposs Mars or Hershey, but Mars possibly. I don&apost know about China, who&aposs No. 1. I know Hershey is not really competition around the rest of the world. It&aposs mostly Mars and�ury everywhere else.

Hill: So in terms of this new CEO coming in,ꂾyond looking at the cost structure in the Oreo division, which is, as we&aposve talked about before, incredibly bloated because they have way too many people working in the Oreo division, do you think that this new CEO is going to look to shed some of the brands that they have? Because that&aposs a strategy we&aposve seen from larger consumer-goods਌ompanies -- Procter & Gamble leaps to mind. But I&aposm thinking about the stock. They have some really strong brands under their umbrella. It&aposs kind of like whenਏord Motor had a record year in terms of sales and the stock went nowhere,ਊnd you could reasonably look at that and say, if you just sold the most vehicles you&aposve ever soldਊnd that&aposs not moving the stock, I&aposm not entirely sure what does. They have the No. 1 cookie brand. Do they need to start shedding some of these other under-performing brands in order to make this a stock worth owning?

Barker: Well,ꃎrtainly, getting rid of anything that&aposs not worth the investment makes sense. If you have new leadership coming in, they can look at things, and਎ven though there may be people who have been working on one specific brand for a long time, and you have a lot of entrenched interests, new eyes can come in and say, "Look,਌hiclets really aren&apost going to be worth doing for the next 50 years." I don&apost think Chiclets are in any danger, but that&aposs one of the many brands that they have. I don&apost know, when&aposs the last time you had some Chiclets?

Hill: I think I was a child. That&aposs how long ago it was.

Barker: Yeah. So I think the biggest brand introduction of late that they keep talking about is the Oreos brand chocolate that they&aposre selling now in the U.S., Oreos Milka, I guess. Have you ever heard of this?

Hill: No, never heard of this.

Barker: Let&aposs get you started on Oreos. You presented almost as fact that Oreos was this bloated division with way too many employees.

Hill: I&aposm waiting for proof that it&aposs not. Look, if you work in the Oreo division, you should be quaking in your boots that a new CEOਏrom a completely different company is going to be occupying the corner office,�use that&aposs one of the first things Dirk is going to do when he takes over. Like, "Show me the P&L on the Oreo਍ivision," because,ਊgain, it&aposs the No. 1 cookie in the world, and somehow this is a stock that&aposs gone nowhere for a year.

Barker: And your research into whether Oreos is a bloated division is going to grocery stores and getting angry at the number of choices of flavors that one can get with the Oreos brand now?

Hill: Exactly, way too many. Stop spending time and effort on these one-off insane flavor combinations. Just keep making the basic Oreos, the thin Oreos and Double Stuf. You can even talk me into the chocolate-filled ones as well. Butਏor crying out loud, stop with the Peeps. Just stop. Move on. You&aposve already got a hit. Move on to other divisions.

Barker: Was it Peeps, was that the straw that broke --

Hill: Yeah, Peeps was the straw that broke my back on that one.

Barker: And since then, you&aposre kind of inundated online with people researching these and sending them to Facebookਊnd the Twitter.

Hill: I appreciate them. I always appreciate the research.

Barker: Here&apossਊ little bit of anger for Chris Hill. Here&aposs a picture of some new insane Oreos਋rand.

Hill: It&aposs two things. One is, there&aposs no substitute for boots-on-the-ground research, so I always applaud that. Two, it signifies that I&aposm not the only one who thinks this way. It&aposs other people taking photos and tweeting them or posting them on Facebook and saying, "Oh my God, what are they doing over there?"

Barker: I don&apost know. if I were going to change something, I think I would change the name.

Hill: Of Oreos?

Barker: Mondelez.

Hill: Oh, yeah.

Barker: What is this?

Hill: Just਌hange it to Oreos. [laughs]

Barker: [laughs] But as a stock, it has under-performedਊny relevant period, most dramatically over the last year. Three, five, 10, 15 years against the S&P andਊgainst the confectioners it&aposs just not keeping up with the competition. They have a lot of well-known brands, and their playbook has been, "Let&aposs਎xtend those brands by combining Oreos with Peeps, or਌hips Ahoy with root beer flavor," or whatever they&aposre doing over there, and now Oreos Milka chocolate. So they&aposve acquired a few brands, and they paid outਊ bunch of dividends. That&aposs probably been aꂾtter use of their capital than some of the acquisitions. But I would agree with what appears to be the case that some new thinking is going to help.

Bill Barker has no position in any stocks mentioned. Chris Hill has no position in any stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends Facebook, Ford, and Twitter. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.


What It Means for Mondelez That CEO Irene Rosenfeld Is Leaving

In this Market Foolery segment, host Chris Hill and Motley Fool Funds&apos Bill Barkerਊttempt to read the tea leaves around the departure of Mondelez&aposs (NASDAQ: MDLZ) longtime CEO. Her replacement is Dirk Van de Put, the head of privately heldꃊnadian frozen-foods player McCain Foods. The packaged-foods segment as a whole has been doing tepidly in the past few years, and even within that, Mondelez stock has underperformed. So what could Van de Put have in mind to shake things up and bring the company some adrenalin?

A full transcript follows the video.

10 stocks we like better than Mondelez InternationalWhen investing geniuses David and Tom Gardner have a stock tip, it can pay to listen. After all, the newsletter they have run for over a decade, Motley Fool Stock Advisor, has tripled the market.*

David and Tom just revealed what they believe are the 10 best stocks for investors to buy right now. and Mondelez International wasn&apost one of them! That&aposs right -- they think these 10 stocks are even better buys.

*Stock Advisor returns as of August 1, 2017

This podcast was recorded on Aug. 2, 2017.   

Chris Hill: Second-quarter results from Mondelez were overshadowed by the news thatꃎO Irene Rosenfeld is stepping down in November. She&aposs going to remain as਌hair of the company. Eleven years in the corner office for Irene Rosenfeld. It&aposs kind of interesting that Mondelez is bringing in an outsider, someone by the name of਍irk Van de Put, who&aposs਌oming over from McCain Foods. They&aposre਋ringing in an outsider, and that suggests to me that all is not well at the house of Oreo at Mondelez. If your thinking is "We need someਏresh perspective, and we&aposre going to bring in an outsider," I think that&aposs what this move telegraphs,ਊs opposed to "Everything&aposs been going so great for so long that we just need a top lieutenant to਌ome in and keep this steady ship afloat."

Bill Barker: It&aposs reasonably tough times in the packaged-food services sector, and Mondelez has not really escaped that and has not outperformed the competition. So I can see going in a new direction asꂾing one of the possible solutions, particularly over the last three years, it has not lived up to the competition. So you might be right about that. I haven&apost seen the details, and I&aposm sure they&aposre not saying anything like that,਋ut it&aposs been an underperforming stock for quite a long period of time. The house of Oreo, it&aposs a lot more than that. Maybe not to you.

Hill: It is the No. 1 cookie brand. I think --

Barker: Biscuit.

Hill: Biscuit?

Barker: Yeah, it&aposs in the biscuit division at Mondelez.

Hill: Maybe that&aposs part of their problem. You showed me a story earlier this morning online, and it was a still photograph of Irene Rosenfeld, and as you indicated, Mondelez has many brands under its umbrella, and the brand that was prominently featuredꂾhind Irene Rosenfeld was, in fact, Oreos. So that&aposs the one they&aposre most associated with.

Barker: Yeah. Certainly, it&aposs the one we talk about the most on this show, although Cadbury is probably a bigger part of the business, I believe. They&aposre the No. 1 or No. 2਌hocolate maker in every country,਎very major market in the world, except U.S. and China.

Hill: Is Hershey (NYSE: HSY) No.1 here in the States?

Barker: I believe Mars is No. 1.

Hill: Oh, yeah, that&aposs right.

Barker: I&aposm not entirely sure if it&aposs Mars or Hershey, but Mars possibly. I don&apost know about China, who&aposs No. 1. I know Hershey is not really competition around the rest of the world. It&aposs mostly Mars and�ury everywhere else.

Hill: So in terms of this new CEO coming in,ꂾyond looking at the cost structure in the Oreo division, which is, as we&aposve talked about before, incredibly bloated because they have way too many people working in the Oreo division, do you think that this new CEO is going to look to shed some of the brands that they have? Because that&aposs a strategy we&aposve seen from larger consumer-goods਌ompanies -- Procter & Gamble leaps to mind. But I&aposm thinking about the stock. They have some really strong brands under their umbrella. It&aposs kind of like whenਏord Motor had a record year in terms of sales and the stock went nowhere,ਊnd you could reasonably look at that and say, if you just sold the most vehicles you&aposve ever soldਊnd that&aposs not moving the stock, I&aposm not entirely sure what does. They have the No. 1 cookie brand. Do they need to start shedding some of these other under-performing brands in order to make this a stock worth owning?

Barker: Well,ꃎrtainly, getting rid of anything that&aposs not worth the investment makes sense. If you have new leadership coming in, they can look at things, and਎ven though there may be people who have been working on one specific brand for a long time, and you have a lot of entrenched interests, new eyes can come in and say, "Look,਌hiclets really aren&apost going to be worth doing for the next 50 years." I don&apost think Chiclets are in any danger, but that&aposs one of the many brands that they have. I don&apost know, when&aposs the last time you had some Chiclets?

Hill: I think I was a child. That&aposs how long ago it was.

Barker: Yeah. So I think the biggest brand introduction of late that they keep talking about is the Oreos brand chocolate that they&aposre selling now in the U.S., Oreos Milka, I guess. Have you ever heard of this?

Hill: No, never heard of this.

Barker: Let&aposs get you started on Oreos. You presented almost as fact that Oreos was this bloated division with way too many employees.

Hill: I&aposm waiting for proof that it&aposs not. Look, if you work in the Oreo division, you should be quaking in your boots that a new CEOਏrom a completely different company is going to be occupying the corner office,�use that&aposs one of the first things Dirk is going to do when he takes over. Like, "Show me the P&L on the Oreo਍ivision," because,ਊgain, it&aposs the No. 1 cookie in the world, and somehow this is a stock that&aposs gone nowhere for a year.

Barker: And your research into whether Oreos is a bloated division is going to grocery stores and getting angry at the number of choices of flavors that one can get with the Oreos brand now?

Hill: Exactly, way too many. Stop spending time and effort on these one-off insane flavor combinations. Just keep making the basic Oreos, the thin Oreos and Double Stuf. You can even talk me into the chocolate-filled ones as well. Butਏor crying out loud, stop with the Peeps. Just stop. Move on. You&aposve already got a hit. Move on to other divisions.

Barker: Was it Peeps, was that the straw that broke --

Hill: Yeah, Peeps was the straw that broke my back on that one.

Barker: And since then, you&aposre kind of inundated online with people researching these and sending them to Facebookਊnd the Twitter.

Hill: I appreciate them. I always appreciate the research.

Barker: Here&apossਊ little bit of anger for Chris Hill. Here&aposs a picture of some new insane Oreos਋rand.

Hill: It&aposs two things. One is, there&aposs no substitute for boots-on-the-ground research, so I always applaud that. Two, it signifies that I&aposm not the only one who thinks this way. It&aposs other people taking photos and tweeting them or posting them on Facebook and saying, "Oh my God, what are they doing over there?"

Barker: I don&apost know. if I were going to change something, I think I would change the name.

Hill: Of Oreos?

Barker: Mondelez.

Hill: Oh, yeah.

Barker: What is this?

Hill: Just਌hange it to Oreos. [laughs]

Barker: [laughs] But as a stock, it has under-performedਊny relevant period, most dramatically over the last year. Three, five, 10, 15 years against the S&P andਊgainst the confectioners it&aposs just not keeping up with the competition. They have a lot of well-known brands, and their playbook has been, "Let&aposs਎xtend those brands by combining Oreos with Peeps, or਌hips Ahoy with root beer flavor," or whatever they&aposre doing over there, and now Oreos Milka chocolate. So they&aposve acquired a few brands, and they paid outਊ bunch of dividends. That&aposs probably been aꂾtter use of their capital than some of the acquisitions. But I would agree with what appears to be the case that some new thinking is going to help.

Bill Barker has no position in any stocks mentioned. Chris Hill has no position in any stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends Facebook, Ford, and Twitter. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.


What It Means for Mondelez That CEO Irene Rosenfeld Is Leaving

In this Market Foolery segment, host Chris Hill and Motley Fool Funds&apos Bill Barkerਊttempt to read the tea leaves around the departure of Mondelez&aposs (NASDAQ: MDLZ) longtime CEO. Her replacement is Dirk Van de Put, the head of privately heldꃊnadian frozen-foods player McCain Foods. The packaged-foods segment as a whole has been doing tepidly in the past few years, and even within that, Mondelez stock has underperformed. So what could Van de Put have in mind to shake things up and bring the company some adrenalin?

A full transcript follows the video.

10 stocks we like better than Mondelez InternationalWhen investing geniuses David and Tom Gardner have a stock tip, it can pay to listen. After all, the newsletter they have run for over a decade, Motley Fool Stock Advisor, has tripled the market.*

David and Tom just revealed what they believe are the 10 best stocks for investors to buy right now. and Mondelez International wasn&apost one of them! That&aposs right -- they think these 10 stocks are even better buys.

*Stock Advisor returns as of August 1, 2017

This podcast was recorded on Aug. 2, 2017.   

Chris Hill: Second-quarter results from Mondelez were overshadowed by the news thatꃎO Irene Rosenfeld is stepping down in November. She&aposs going to remain as਌hair of the company. Eleven years in the corner office for Irene Rosenfeld. It&aposs kind of interesting that Mondelez is bringing in an outsider, someone by the name of਍irk Van de Put, who&aposs਌oming over from McCain Foods. They&aposre਋ringing in an outsider, and that suggests to me that all is not well at the house of Oreo at Mondelez. If your thinking is "We need someਏresh perspective, and we&aposre going to bring in an outsider," I think that&aposs what this move telegraphs,ਊs opposed to "Everything&aposs been going so great for so long that we just need a top lieutenant to਌ome in and keep this steady ship afloat."

Bill Barker: It&aposs reasonably tough times in the packaged-food services sector, and Mondelez has not really escaped that and has not outperformed the competition. So I can see going in a new direction asꂾing one of the possible solutions, particularly over the last three years, it has not lived up to the competition. So you might be right about that. I haven&apost seen the details, and I&aposm sure they&aposre not saying anything like that,਋ut it&aposs been an underperforming stock for quite a long period of time. The house of Oreo, it&aposs a lot more than that. Maybe not to you.

Hill: It is the No. 1 cookie brand. I think --

Barker: Biscuit.

Hill: Biscuit?

Barker: Yeah, it&aposs in the biscuit division at Mondelez.

Hill: Maybe that&aposs part of their problem. You showed me a story earlier this morning online, and it was a still photograph of Irene Rosenfeld, and as you indicated, Mondelez has many brands under its umbrella, and the brand that was prominently featuredꂾhind Irene Rosenfeld was, in fact, Oreos. So that&aposs the one they&aposre most associated with.

Barker: Yeah. Certainly, it&aposs the one we talk about the most on this show, although Cadbury is probably a bigger part of the business, I believe. They&aposre the No. 1 or No. 2਌hocolate maker in every country,਎very major market in the world, except U.S. and China.

Hill: Is Hershey (NYSE: HSY) No.1 here in the States?

Barker: I believe Mars is No. 1.

Hill: Oh, yeah, that&aposs right.

Barker: I&aposm not entirely sure if it&aposs Mars or Hershey, but Mars possibly. I don&apost know about China, who&aposs No. 1. I know Hershey is not really competition around the rest of the world. It&aposs mostly Mars and�ury everywhere else.

Hill: So in terms of this new CEO coming in,ꂾyond looking at the cost structure in the Oreo division, which is, as we&aposve talked about before, incredibly bloated because they have way too many people working in the Oreo division, do you think that this new CEO is going to look to shed some of the brands that they have? Because that&aposs a strategy we&aposve seen from larger consumer-goods਌ompanies -- Procter & Gamble leaps to mind. But I&aposm thinking about the stock. They have some really strong brands under their umbrella. It&aposs kind of like whenਏord Motor had a record year in terms of sales and the stock went nowhere,ਊnd you could reasonably look at that and say, if you just sold the most vehicles you&aposve ever soldਊnd that&aposs not moving the stock, I&aposm not entirely sure what does. They have the No. 1 cookie brand. Do they need to start shedding some of these other under-performing brands in order to make this a stock worth owning?

Barker: Well,ꃎrtainly, getting rid of anything that&aposs not worth the investment makes sense. If you have new leadership coming in, they can look at things, and਎ven though there may be people who have been working on one specific brand for a long time, and you have a lot of entrenched interests, new eyes can come in and say, "Look,਌hiclets really aren&apost going to be worth doing for the next 50 years." I don&apost think Chiclets are in any danger, but that&aposs one of the many brands that they have. I don&apost know, when&aposs the last time you had some Chiclets?

Hill: I think I was a child. That&aposs how long ago it was.

Barker: Yeah. So I think the biggest brand introduction of late that they keep talking about is the Oreos brand chocolate that they&aposre selling now in the U.S., Oreos Milka, I guess. Have you ever heard of this?

Hill: No, never heard of this.

Barker: Let&aposs get you started on Oreos. You presented almost as fact that Oreos was this bloated division with way too many employees.

Hill: I&aposm waiting for proof that it&aposs not. Look, if you work in the Oreo division, you should be quaking in your boots that a new CEOਏrom a completely different company is going to be occupying the corner office,�use that&aposs one of the first things Dirk is going to do when he takes over. Like, "Show me the P&L on the Oreo਍ivision," because,ਊgain, it&aposs the No. 1 cookie in the world, and somehow this is a stock that&aposs gone nowhere for a year.

Barker: And your research into whether Oreos is a bloated division is going to grocery stores and getting angry at the number of choices of flavors that one can get with the Oreos brand now?

Hill: Exactly, way too many. Stop spending time and effort on these one-off insane flavor combinations. Just keep making the basic Oreos, the thin Oreos and Double Stuf. You can even talk me into the chocolate-filled ones as well. Butਏor crying out loud, stop with the Peeps. Just stop. Move on. You&aposve already got a hit. Move on to other divisions.

Barker: Was it Peeps, was that the straw that broke --

Hill: Yeah, Peeps was the straw that broke my back on that one.

Barker: And since then, you&aposre kind of inundated online with people researching these and sending them to Facebookਊnd the Twitter.

Hill: I appreciate them. I always appreciate the research.

Barker: Here&apossਊ little bit of anger for Chris Hill. Here&aposs a picture of some new insane Oreos਋rand.

Hill: It&aposs two things. One is, there&aposs no substitute for boots-on-the-ground research, so I always applaud that. Two, it signifies that I&aposm not the only one who thinks this way. It&aposs other people taking photos and tweeting them or posting them on Facebook and saying, "Oh my God, what are they doing over there?"

Barker: I don&apost know. if I were going to change something, I think I would change the name.

Hill: Of Oreos?

Barker: Mondelez.

Hill: Oh, yeah.

Barker: What is this?

Hill: Just਌hange it to Oreos. [laughs]

Barker: [laughs] But as a stock, it has under-performedਊny relevant period, most dramatically over the last year. Three, five, 10, 15 years against the S&P andਊgainst the confectioners it&aposs just not keeping up with the competition. They have a lot of well-known brands, and their playbook has been, "Let&aposs਎xtend those brands by combining Oreos with Peeps, or਌hips Ahoy with root beer flavor," or whatever they&aposre doing over there, and now Oreos Milka chocolate. So they&aposve acquired a few brands, and they paid outਊ bunch of dividends. That&aposs probably been aꂾtter use of their capital than some of the acquisitions. But I would agree with what appears to be the case that some new thinking is going to help.

Bill Barker has no position in any stocks mentioned. Chris Hill has no position in any stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends Facebook, Ford, and Twitter. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.


What It Means for Mondelez That CEO Irene Rosenfeld Is Leaving

In this Market Foolery segment, host Chris Hill and Motley Fool Funds&apos Bill Barkerਊttempt to read the tea leaves around the departure of Mondelez&aposs (NASDAQ: MDLZ) longtime CEO. Her replacement is Dirk Van de Put, the head of privately heldꃊnadian frozen-foods player McCain Foods. The packaged-foods segment as a whole has been doing tepidly in the past few years, and even within that, Mondelez stock has underperformed. So what could Van de Put have in mind to shake things up and bring the company some adrenalin?

A full transcript follows the video.

10 stocks we like better than Mondelez InternationalWhen investing geniuses David and Tom Gardner have a stock tip, it can pay to listen. After all, the newsletter they have run for over a decade, Motley Fool Stock Advisor, has tripled the market.*

David and Tom just revealed what they believe are the 10 best stocks for investors to buy right now. and Mondelez International wasn&apost one of them! That&aposs right -- they think these 10 stocks are even better buys.

*Stock Advisor returns as of August 1, 2017

This podcast was recorded on Aug. 2, 2017.   

Chris Hill: Second-quarter results from Mondelez were overshadowed by the news thatꃎO Irene Rosenfeld is stepping down in November. She&aposs going to remain as਌hair of the company. Eleven years in the corner office for Irene Rosenfeld. It&aposs kind of interesting that Mondelez is bringing in an outsider, someone by the name of਍irk Van de Put, who&aposs਌oming over from McCain Foods. They&aposre਋ringing in an outsider, and that suggests to me that all is not well at the house of Oreo at Mondelez. If your thinking is "We need someਏresh perspective, and we&aposre going to bring in an outsider," I think that&aposs what this move telegraphs,ਊs opposed to "Everything&aposs been going so great for so long that we just need a top lieutenant to਌ome in and keep this steady ship afloat."

Bill Barker: It&aposs reasonably tough times in the packaged-food services sector, and Mondelez has not really escaped that and has not outperformed the competition. So I can see going in a new direction asꂾing one of the possible solutions, particularly over the last three years, it has not lived up to the competition. So you might be right about that. I haven&apost seen the details, and I&aposm sure they&aposre not saying anything like that,਋ut it&aposs been an underperforming stock for quite a long period of time. The house of Oreo, it&aposs a lot more than that. Maybe not to you.

Hill: It is the No. 1 cookie brand. I think --

Barker: Biscuit.

Hill: Biscuit?

Barker: Yeah, it&aposs in the biscuit division at Mondelez.

Hill: Maybe that&aposs part of their problem. You showed me a story earlier this morning online, and it was a still photograph of Irene Rosenfeld, and as you indicated, Mondelez has many brands under its umbrella, and the brand that was prominently featuredꂾhind Irene Rosenfeld was, in fact, Oreos. So that&aposs the one they&aposre most associated with.

Barker: Yeah. Certainly, it&aposs the one we talk about the most on this show, although Cadbury is probably a bigger part of the business, I believe. They&aposre the No. 1 or No. 2਌hocolate maker in every country,਎very major market in the world, except U.S. and China.

Hill: Is Hershey (NYSE: HSY) No.1 here in the States?

Barker: I believe Mars is No. 1.

Hill: Oh, yeah, that&aposs right.

Barker: I&aposm not entirely sure if it&aposs Mars or Hershey, but Mars possibly. I don&apost know about China, who&aposs No. 1. I know Hershey is not really competition around the rest of the world. It&aposs mostly Mars and�ury everywhere else.

Hill: So in terms of this new CEO coming in,ꂾyond looking at the cost structure in the Oreo division, which is, as we&aposve talked about before, incredibly bloated because they have way too many people working in the Oreo division, do you think that this new CEO is going to look to shed some of the brands that they have? Because that&aposs a strategy we&aposve seen from larger consumer-goods਌ompanies -- Procter & Gamble leaps to mind. But I&aposm thinking about the stock. They have some really strong brands under their umbrella. It&aposs kind of like whenਏord Motor had a record year in terms of sales and the stock went nowhere,ਊnd you could reasonably look at that and say, if you just sold the most vehicles you&aposve ever soldਊnd that&aposs not moving the stock, I&aposm not entirely sure what does. They have the No. 1 cookie brand. Do they need to start shedding some of these other under-performing brands in order to make this a stock worth owning?

Barker: Well,ꃎrtainly, getting rid of anything that&aposs not worth the investment makes sense. If you have new leadership coming in, they can look at things, and਎ven though there may be people who have been working on one specific brand for a long time, and you have a lot of entrenched interests, new eyes can come in and say, "Look,਌hiclets really aren&apost going to be worth doing for the next 50 years." I don&apost think Chiclets are in any danger, but that&aposs one of the many brands that they have. I don&apost know, when&aposs the last time you had some Chiclets?

Hill: I think I was a child. That&aposs how long ago it was.

Barker: Yeah. So I think the biggest brand introduction of late that they keep talking about is the Oreos brand chocolate that they&aposre selling now in the U.S., Oreos Milka, I guess. Have you ever heard of this?

Hill: No, never heard of this.

Barker: Let&aposs get you started on Oreos. You presented almost as fact that Oreos was this bloated division with way too many employees.

Hill: I&aposm waiting for proof that it&aposs not. Look, if you work in the Oreo division, you should be quaking in your boots that a new CEOਏrom a completely different company is going to be occupying the corner office,�use that&aposs one of the first things Dirk is going to do when he takes over. Like, "Show me the P&L on the Oreo਍ivision," because,ਊgain, it&aposs the No. 1 cookie in the world, and somehow this is a stock that&aposs gone nowhere for a year.

Barker: And your research into whether Oreos is a bloated division is going to grocery stores and getting angry at the number of choices of flavors that one can get with the Oreos brand now?

Hill: Exactly, way too many. Stop spending time and effort on these one-off insane flavor combinations. Just keep making the basic Oreos, the thin Oreos and Double Stuf. You can even talk me into the chocolate-filled ones as well. Butਏor crying out loud, stop with the Peeps. Just stop. Move on. You&aposve already got a hit. Move on to other divisions.

Barker: Was it Peeps, was that the straw that broke --

Hill: Yeah, Peeps was the straw that broke my back on that one.

Barker: And since then, you&aposre kind of inundated online with people researching these and sending them to Facebookਊnd the Twitter.

Hill: I appreciate them. I always appreciate the research.

Barker: Here&apossਊ little bit of anger for Chris Hill. Here&aposs a picture of some new insane Oreos਋rand.

Hill: It&aposs two things. One is, there&aposs no substitute for boots-on-the-ground research, so I always applaud that. Two, it signifies that I&aposm not the only one who thinks this way. It&aposs other people taking photos and tweeting them or posting them on Facebook and saying, "Oh my God, what are they doing over there?"

Barker: I don&apost know. if I were going to change something, I think I would change the name.

Hill: Of Oreos?

Barker: Mondelez.

Hill: Oh, yeah.

Barker: What is this?

Hill: Just਌hange it to Oreos. [laughs]

Barker: [laughs] But as a stock, it has under-performedਊny relevant period, most dramatically over the last year. Three, five, 10, 15 years against the S&P andਊgainst the confectioners it&aposs just not keeping up with the competition. They have a lot of well-known brands, and their playbook has been, "Let&aposs਎xtend those brands by combining Oreos with Peeps, or਌hips Ahoy with root beer flavor," or whatever they&aposre doing over there, and now Oreos Milka chocolate. So they&aposve acquired a few brands, and they paid outਊ bunch of dividends. That&aposs probably been aꂾtter use of their capital than some of the acquisitions. But I would agree with what appears to be the case that some new thinking is going to help.

Bill Barker has no position in any stocks mentioned. Chris Hill has no position in any stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends Facebook, Ford, and Twitter. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.


What It Means for Mondelez That CEO Irene Rosenfeld Is Leaving

In this Market Foolery segment, host Chris Hill and Motley Fool Funds&apos Bill Barkerਊttempt to read the tea leaves around the departure of Mondelez&aposs (NASDAQ: MDLZ) longtime CEO. Her replacement is Dirk Van de Put, the head of privately heldꃊnadian frozen-foods player McCain Foods. The packaged-foods segment as a whole has been doing tepidly in the past few years, and even within that, Mondelez stock has underperformed. So what could Van de Put have in mind to shake things up and bring the company some adrenalin?

A full transcript follows the video.

10 stocks we like better than Mondelez InternationalWhen investing geniuses David and Tom Gardner have a stock tip, it can pay to listen. After all, the newsletter they have run for over a decade, Motley Fool Stock Advisor, has tripled the market.*

David and Tom just revealed what they believe are the 10 best stocks for investors to buy right now. and Mondelez International wasn&apost one of them! That&aposs right -- they think these 10 stocks are even better buys.

*Stock Advisor returns as of August 1, 2017

This podcast was recorded on Aug. 2, 2017.   

Chris Hill: Second-quarter results from Mondelez were overshadowed by the news thatꃎO Irene Rosenfeld is stepping down in November. She&aposs going to remain as਌hair of the company. Eleven years in the corner office for Irene Rosenfeld. It&aposs kind of interesting that Mondelez is bringing in an outsider, someone by the name of਍irk Van de Put, who&aposs਌oming over from McCain Foods. They&aposre਋ringing in an outsider, and that suggests to me that all is not well at the house of Oreo at Mondelez. If your thinking is "We need someਏresh perspective, and we&aposre going to bring in an outsider," I think that&aposs what this move telegraphs,ਊs opposed to "Everything&aposs been going so great for so long that we just need a top lieutenant to਌ome in and keep this steady ship afloat."

Bill Barker: It&aposs reasonably tough times in the packaged-food services sector, and Mondelez has not really escaped that and has not outperformed the competition. So I can see going in a new direction asꂾing one of the possible solutions, particularly over the last three years, it has not lived up to the competition. So you might be right about that. I haven&apost seen the details, and I&aposm sure they&aposre not saying anything like that,਋ut it&aposs been an underperforming stock for quite a long period of time. The house of Oreo, it&aposs a lot more than that. Maybe not to you.

Hill: It is the No. 1 cookie brand. I think --

Barker: Biscuit.

Hill: Biscuit?

Barker: Yeah, it&aposs in the biscuit division at Mondelez.

Hill: Maybe that&aposs part of their problem. You showed me a story earlier this morning online, and it was a still photograph of Irene Rosenfeld, and as you indicated, Mondelez has many brands under its umbrella, and the brand that was prominently featuredꂾhind Irene Rosenfeld was, in fact, Oreos. So that&aposs the one they&aposre most associated with.

Barker: Yeah. Certainly, it&aposs the one we talk about the most on this show, although Cadbury is probably a bigger part of the business, I believe. They&aposre the No. 1 or No. 2਌hocolate maker in every country,਎very major market in the world, except U.S. and China.

Hill: Is Hershey (NYSE: HSY) No.1 here in the States?

Barker: I believe Mars is No. 1.

Hill: Oh, yeah, that&aposs right.

Barker: I&aposm not entirely sure if it&aposs Mars or Hershey, but Mars possibly. I don&apost know about China, who&aposs No. 1. I know Hershey is not really competition around the rest of the world. It&aposs mostly Mars and�ury everywhere else.

Hill: So in terms of this new CEO coming in,ꂾyond looking at the cost structure in the Oreo division, which is, as we&aposve talked about before, incredibly bloated because they have way too many people working in the Oreo division, do you think that this new CEO is going to look to shed some of the brands that they have? Because that&aposs a strategy we&aposve seen from larger consumer-goods਌ompanies -- Procter & Gamble leaps to mind. But I&aposm thinking about the stock. They have some really strong brands under their umbrella. It&aposs kind of like whenਏord Motor had a record year in terms of sales and the stock went nowhere,ਊnd you could reasonably look at that and say, if you just sold the most vehicles you&aposve ever soldਊnd that&aposs not moving the stock, I&aposm not entirely sure what does. They have the No. 1 cookie brand. Do they need to start shedding some of these other under-performing brands in order to make this a stock worth owning?

Barker: Well,ꃎrtainly, getting rid of anything that&aposs not worth the investment makes sense. If you have new leadership coming in, they can look at things, and਎ven though there may be people who have been working on one specific brand for a long time, and you have a lot of entrenched interests, new eyes can come in and say, "Look,਌hiclets really aren&apost going to be worth doing for the next 50 years." I don&apost think Chiclets are in any danger, but that&aposs one of the many brands that they have. I don&apost know, when&aposs the last time you had some Chiclets?

Hill: I think I was a child. That&aposs how long ago it was.

Barker: Yeah. So I think the biggest brand introduction of late that they keep talking about is the Oreos brand chocolate that they&aposre selling now in the U.S., Oreos Milka, I guess. Have you ever heard of this?

Hill: No, never heard of this.

Barker: Let&aposs get you started on Oreos. You presented almost as fact that Oreos was this bloated division with way too many employees.

Hill: I&aposm waiting for proof that it&aposs not. Look, if you work in the Oreo division, you should be quaking in your boots that a new CEOਏrom a completely different company is going to be occupying the corner office,�use that&aposs one of the first things Dirk is going to do when he takes over. Like, "Show me the P&L on the Oreo਍ivision," because,ਊgain, it&aposs the No. 1 cookie in the world, and somehow this is a stock that&aposs gone nowhere for a year.

Barker: And your research into whether Oreos is a bloated division is going to grocery stores and getting angry at the number of choices of flavors that one can get with the Oreos brand now?

Hill: Exactly, way too many. Stop spending time and effort on these one-off insane flavor combinations. Just keep making the basic Oreos, the thin Oreos and Double Stuf. You can even talk me into the chocolate-filled ones as well. Butਏor crying out loud, stop with the Peeps. Just stop. Move on. You&aposve already got a hit. Move on to other divisions.

Barker: Was it Peeps, was that the straw that broke --

Hill: Yeah, Peeps was the straw that broke my back on that one.

Barker: And since then, you&aposre kind of inundated online with people researching these and sending them to Facebookਊnd the Twitter.

Hill: I appreciate them. I always appreciate the research.

Barker: Here&apossਊ little bit of anger for Chris Hill. Here&aposs a picture of some new insane Oreos਋rand.

Hill: It&aposs two things. One is, there&aposs no substitute for boots-on-the-ground research, so I always applaud that. Two, it signifies that I&aposm not the only one who thinks this way. It&aposs other people taking photos and tweeting them or posting them on Facebook and saying, "Oh my God, what are they doing over there?"

Barker: I don&apost know. if I were going to change something, I think I would change the name.

Hill: Of Oreos?

Barker: Mondelez.

Hill: Oh, yeah.

Barker: What is this?

Hill: Just਌hange it to Oreos. [laughs]

Barker: [laughs] But as a stock, it has under-performedਊny relevant period, most dramatically over the last year. Three, five, 10, 15 years against the S&P andਊgainst the confectioners it&aposs just not keeping up with the competition. They have a lot of well-known brands, and their playbook has been, "Let&aposs਎xtend those brands by combining Oreos with Peeps, or਌hips Ahoy with root beer flavor," or whatever they&aposre doing over there, and now Oreos Milka chocolate. So they&aposve acquired a few brands, and they paid outਊ bunch of dividends. That&aposs probably been aꂾtter use of their capital than some of the acquisitions. But I would agree with what appears to be the case that some new thinking is going to help.

Bill Barker has no position in any stocks mentioned. Chris Hill has no position in any stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends Facebook, Ford, and Twitter. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.


What It Means for Mondelez That CEO Irene Rosenfeld Is Leaving

In this Market Foolery segment, host Chris Hill and Motley Fool Funds&apos Bill Barkerਊttempt to read the tea leaves around the departure of Mondelez&aposs (NASDAQ: MDLZ) longtime CEO. Her replacement is Dirk Van de Put, the head of privately heldꃊnadian frozen-foods player McCain Foods. The packaged-foods segment as a whole has been doing tepidly in the past few years, and even within that, Mondelez stock has underperformed. So what could Van de Put have in mind to shake things up and bring the company some adrenalin?

A full transcript follows the video.

10 stocks we like better than Mondelez InternationalWhen investing geniuses David and Tom Gardner have a stock tip, it can pay to listen. After all, the newsletter they have run for over a decade, Motley Fool Stock Advisor, has tripled the market.*

David and Tom just revealed what they believe are the 10 best stocks for investors to buy right now. and Mondelez International wasn&apost one of them! That&aposs right -- they think these 10 stocks are even better buys.

*Stock Advisor returns as of August 1, 2017

This podcast was recorded on Aug. 2, 2017.   

Chris Hill: Second-quarter results from Mondelez were overshadowed by the news thatꃎO Irene Rosenfeld is stepping down in November. She&aposs going to remain as਌hair of the company. Eleven years in the corner office for Irene Rosenfeld. It&aposs kind of interesting that Mondelez is bringing in an outsider, someone by the name of਍irk Van de Put, who&aposs਌oming over from McCain Foods. They&aposre਋ringing in an outsider, and that suggests to me that all is not well at the house of Oreo at Mondelez. If your thinking is "We need someਏresh perspective, and we&aposre going to bring in an outsider," I think that&aposs what this move telegraphs,ਊs opposed to "Everything&aposs been going so great for so long that we just need a top lieutenant to਌ome in and keep this steady ship afloat."

Bill Barker: It&aposs reasonably tough times in the packaged-food services sector, and Mondelez has not really escaped that and has not outperformed the competition. So I can see going in a new direction asꂾing one of the possible solutions, particularly over the last three years, it has not lived up to the competition. So you might be right about that. I haven&apost seen the details, and I&aposm sure they&aposre not saying anything like that,਋ut it&aposs been an underperforming stock for quite a long period of time. The house of Oreo, it&aposs a lot more than that. Maybe not to you.

Hill: It is the No. 1 cookie brand. I think --

Barker: Biscuit.

Hill: Biscuit?

Barker: Yeah, it&aposs in the biscuit division at Mondelez.

Hill: Maybe that&aposs part of their problem. You showed me a story earlier this morning online, and it was a still photograph of Irene Rosenfeld, and as you indicated, Mondelez has many brands under its umbrella, and the brand that was prominently featuredꂾhind Irene Rosenfeld was, in fact, Oreos. So that&aposs the one they&aposre most associated with.

Barker: Yeah. Certainly, it&aposs the one we talk about the most on this show, although Cadbury is probably a bigger part of the business, I believe. They&aposre the No. 1 or No. 2਌hocolate maker in every country,਎very major market in the world, except U.S. and China.

Hill: Is Hershey (NYSE: HSY) No.1 here in the States?

Barker: I believe Mars is No. 1.

Hill: Oh, yeah, that&aposs right.

Barker: I&aposm not entirely sure if it&aposs Mars or Hershey, but Mars possibly. I don&apost know about China, who&aposs No. 1. I know Hershey is not really competition around the rest of the world. It&aposs mostly Mars and�ury everywhere else.

Hill: So in terms of this new CEO coming in,ꂾyond looking at the cost structure in the Oreo division, which is, as we&aposve talked about before, incredibly bloated because they have way too many people working in the Oreo division, do you think that this new CEO is going to look to shed some of the brands that they have? Because that&aposs a strategy we&aposve seen from larger consumer-goods਌ompanies -- Procter & Gamble leaps to mind. But I&aposm thinking about the stock. They have some really strong brands under their umbrella. It&aposs kind of like whenਏord Motor had a record year in terms of sales and the stock went nowhere,ਊnd you could reasonably look at that and say, if you just sold the most vehicles you&aposve ever soldਊnd that&aposs not moving the stock, I&aposm not entirely sure what does. They have the No. 1 cookie brand. Do they need to start shedding some of these other under-performing brands in order to make this a stock worth owning?

Barker: Well,ꃎrtainly, getting rid of anything that&aposs not worth the investment makes sense. If you have new leadership coming in, they can look at things, and਎ven though there may be people who have been working on one specific brand for a long time, and you have a lot of entrenched interests, new eyes can come in and say, "Look,਌hiclets really aren&apost going to be worth doing for the next 50 years." I don&apost think Chiclets are in any danger, but that&aposs one of the many brands that they have. I don&apost know, when&aposs the last time you had some Chiclets?

Hill: I think I was a child. That&aposs how long ago it was.

Barker: Yeah. So I think the biggest brand introduction of late that they keep talking about is the Oreos brand chocolate that they&aposre selling now in the U.S., Oreos Milka, I guess. Have you ever heard of this?

Hill: No, never heard of this.

Barker: Let&aposs get you started on Oreos. You presented almost as fact that Oreos was this bloated division with way too many employees.

Hill: I&aposm waiting for proof that it&aposs not. Look, if you work in the Oreo division, you should be quaking in your boots that a new CEOਏrom a completely different company is going to be occupying the corner office,�use that&aposs one of the first things Dirk is going to do when he takes over. Like, "Show me the P&L on the Oreo਍ivision," because,ਊgain, it&aposs the No. 1 cookie in the world, and somehow this is a stock that&aposs gone nowhere for a year.

Barker: And your research into whether Oreos is a bloated division is going to grocery stores and getting angry at the number of choices of flavors that one can get with the Oreos brand now?

Hill: Exactly, way too many. Stop spending time and effort on these one-off insane flavor combinations. Just keep making the basic Oreos, the thin Oreos and Double Stuf. You can even talk me into the chocolate-filled ones as well. Butਏor crying out loud, stop with the Peeps. Just stop. Move on. You&aposve already got a hit. Move on to other divisions.

Barker: Was it Peeps, was that the straw that broke --

Hill: Yeah, Peeps was the straw that broke my back on that one.

Barker: And since then, you&aposre kind of inundated online with people researching these and sending them to Facebookਊnd the Twitter.

Hill: I appreciate them. I always appreciate the research.

Barker: Here&apossਊ little bit of anger for Chris Hill. Here&aposs a picture of some new insane Oreos਋rand.

Hill: It&aposs two things. One is, there&aposs no substitute for boots-on-the-ground research, so I always applaud that. Two, it signifies that I&aposm not the only one who thinks this way. It&aposs other people taking photos and tweeting them or posting them on Facebook and saying, "Oh my God, what are they doing over there?"

Barker: I don&apost know. if I were going to change something, I think I would change the name.

Hill: Of Oreos?

Barker: Mondelez.

Hill: Oh, yeah.

Barker: What is this?

Hill: Just਌hange it to Oreos. [laughs]

Barker: [laughs] But as a stock, it has under-performedਊny relevant period, most dramatically over the last year. Three, five, 10, 15 years against the S&P andਊgainst the confectioners it&aposs just not keeping up with the competition. They have a lot of well-known brands, and their playbook has been, "Let&aposs਎xtend those brands by combining Oreos with Peeps, or਌hips Ahoy with root beer flavor," or whatever they&aposre doing over there, and now Oreos Milka chocolate. So they&aposve acquired a few brands, and they paid outਊ bunch of dividends. That&aposs probably been aꂾtter use of their capital than some of the acquisitions. But I would agree with what appears to be the case that some new thinking is going to help.

Bill Barker has no position in any stocks mentioned. Chris Hill has no position in any stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends Facebook, Ford, and Twitter. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.


What It Means for Mondelez That CEO Irene Rosenfeld Is Leaving

In this Market Foolery segment, host Chris Hill and Motley Fool Funds&apos Bill Barkerਊttempt to read the tea leaves around the departure of Mondelez&aposs (NASDAQ: MDLZ) longtime CEO. Her replacement is Dirk Van de Put, the head of privately heldꃊnadian frozen-foods player McCain Foods. The packaged-foods segment as a whole has been doing tepidly in the past few years, and even within that, Mondelez stock has underperformed. So what could Van de Put have in mind to shake things up and bring the company some adrenalin?

A full transcript follows the video.

10 stocks we like better than Mondelez InternationalWhen investing geniuses David and Tom Gardner have a stock tip, it can pay to listen. After all, the newsletter they have run for over a decade, Motley Fool Stock Advisor, has tripled the market.*

David and Tom just revealed what they believe are the 10 best stocks for investors to buy right now. and Mondelez International wasn&apost one of them! That&aposs right -- they think these 10 stocks are even better buys.

*Stock Advisor returns as of August 1, 2017

This podcast was recorded on Aug. 2, 2017.   

Chris Hill: Second-quarter results from Mondelez were overshadowed by the news thatꃎO Irene Rosenfeld is stepping down in November. She&aposs going to remain as਌hair of the company. Eleven years in the corner office for Irene Rosenfeld. It&aposs kind of interesting that Mondelez is bringing in an outsider, someone by the name of਍irk Van de Put, who&aposs਌oming over from McCain Foods. They&aposre਋ringing in an outsider, and that suggests to me that all is not well at the house of Oreo at Mondelez. If your thinking is "We need someਏresh perspective, and we&aposre going to bring in an outsider," I think that&aposs what this move telegraphs,ਊs opposed to "Everything&aposs been going so great for so long that we just need a top lieutenant to਌ome in and keep this steady ship afloat."

Bill Barker: It&aposs reasonably tough times in the packaged-food services sector, and Mondelez has not really escaped that and has not outperformed the competition. So I can see going in a new direction asꂾing one of the possible solutions, particularly over the last three years, it has not lived up to the competition. So you might be right about that. I haven&apost seen the details, and I&aposm sure they&aposre not saying anything like that,਋ut it&aposs been an underperforming stock for quite a long period of time. The house of Oreo, it&aposs a lot more than that. Maybe not to you.

Hill: It is the No. 1 cookie brand. I think --

Barker: Biscuit.

Hill: Biscuit?

Barker: Yeah, it&aposs in the biscuit division at Mondelez.

Hill: Maybe that&aposs part of their problem. You showed me a story earlier this morning online, and it was a still photograph of Irene Rosenfeld, and as you indicated, Mondelez has many brands under its umbrella, and the brand that was prominently featuredꂾhind Irene Rosenfeld was, in fact, Oreos. So that&aposs the one they&aposre most associated with.

Barker: Yeah. Certainly, it&aposs the one we talk about the most on this show, although Cadbury is probably a bigger part of the business, I believe. They&aposre the No. 1 or No. 2਌hocolate maker in every country,਎very major market in the world, except U.S. and China.

Hill: Is Hershey (NYSE: HSY) No.1 here in the States?

Barker: I believe Mars is No. 1.

Hill: Oh, yeah, that&aposs right.

Barker: I&aposm not entirely sure if it&aposs Mars or Hershey, but Mars possibly. I don&apost know about China, who&aposs No. 1. I know Hershey is not really competition around the rest of the world. It&aposs mostly Mars and�ury everywhere else.

Hill: So in terms of this new CEO coming in,ꂾyond looking at the cost structure in the Oreo division, which is, as we&aposve talked about before, incredibly bloated because they have way too many people working in the Oreo division, do you think that this new CEO is going to look to shed some of the brands that they have? Because that&aposs a strategy we&aposve seen from larger consumer-goods਌ompanies -- Procter & Gamble leaps to mind. But I&aposm thinking about the stock. They have some really strong brands under their umbrella. It&aposs kind of like whenਏord Motor had a record year in terms of sales and the stock went nowhere,ਊnd you could reasonably look at that and say, if you just sold the most vehicles you&aposve ever soldਊnd that&aposs not moving the stock, I&aposm not entirely sure what does. They have the No. 1 cookie brand. Do they need to start shedding some of these other under-performing brands in order to make this a stock worth owning?

Barker: Well,ꃎrtainly, getting rid of anything that&aposs not worth the investment makes sense. If you have new leadership coming in, they can look at things, and਎ven though there may be people who have been working on one specific brand for a long time, and you have a lot of entrenched interests, new eyes can come in and say, "Look,਌hiclets really aren&apost going to be worth doing for the next 50 years." I don&apost think Chiclets are in any danger, but that&aposs one of the many brands that they have. I don&apost know, when&aposs the last time you had some Chiclets?

Hill: I think I was a child. That&aposs how long ago it was.

Barker: Yeah. So I think the biggest brand introduction of late that they keep talking about is the Oreos brand chocolate that they&aposre selling now in the U.S., Oreos Milka, I guess. Have you ever heard of this?

Hill: No, never heard of this.

Barker: Let&aposs get you started on Oreos. You presented almost as fact that Oreos was this bloated division with way too many employees.

Hill: I&aposm waiting for proof that it&aposs not. Look, if you work in the Oreo division, you should be quaking in your boots that a new CEOਏrom a completely different company is going to be occupying the corner office,�use that&aposs one of the first things Dirk is going to do when he takes over. Like, "Show me the P&L on the Oreo਍ivision," because,ਊgain, it&aposs the No. 1 cookie in the world, and somehow this is a stock that&aposs gone nowhere for a year.

Barker: And your research into whether Oreos is a bloated division is going to grocery stores and getting angry at the number of choices of flavors that one can get with the Oreos brand now?

Hill: Exactly, way too many. Stop spending time and effort on these one-off insane flavor combinations. Just keep making the basic Oreos, the thin Oreos and Double Stuf. You can even talk me into the chocolate-filled ones as well. Butਏor crying out loud, stop with the Peeps. Just stop. Move on. You&aposve already got a hit. Move on to other divisions.

Barker: Was it Peeps, was that the straw that broke --

Hill: Yeah, Peeps was the straw that broke my back on that one.

Barker: And since then, you&aposre kind of inundated online with people researching these and sending them to Facebookਊnd the Twitter.

Hill: I appreciate them. I always appreciate the research.

Barker: Here&apossਊ little bit of anger for Chris Hill. Here&aposs a picture of some new insane Oreos਋rand.

Hill: It&aposs two things. One is, there&aposs no substitute for boots-on-the-ground research, so I always applaud that. Two, it signifies that I&aposm not the only one who thinks this way. It&aposs other people taking photos and tweeting them or posting them on Facebook and saying, "Oh my God, what are they doing over there?"

Barker: I don&apost know. if I were going to change something, I think I would change the name.

Hill: Of Oreos?

Barker: Mondelez.

Hill: Oh, yeah.

Barker: What is this?

Hill: Just਌hange it to Oreos. [laughs]

Barker: [laughs] But as a stock, it has under-performedਊny relevant period, most dramatically over the last year. Three, five, 10, 15 years against the S&P andਊgainst the confectioners it&aposs just not keeping up with the competition. They have a lot of well-known brands, and their playbook has been, "Let&aposs਎xtend those brands by combining Oreos with Peeps, or਌hips Ahoy with root beer flavor," or whatever they&aposre doing over there, and now Oreos Milka chocolate. So they&aposve acquired a few brands, and they paid outਊ bunch of dividends. That&aposs probably been aꂾtter use of their capital than some of the acquisitions. But I would agree with what appears to be the case that some new thinking is going to help.

Bill Barker has no position in any stocks mentioned. Chris Hill has no position in any stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends Facebook, Ford, and Twitter. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.


What It Means for Mondelez That CEO Irene Rosenfeld Is Leaving

In this Market Foolery segment, host Chris Hill and Motley Fool Funds&apos Bill Barkerਊttempt to read the tea leaves around the departure of Mondelez&aposs (NASDAQ: MDLZ) longtime CEO. Her replacement is Dirk Van de Put, the head of privately heldꃊnadian frozen-foods player McCain Foods. The packaged-foods segment as a whole has been doing tepidly in the past few years, and even within that, Mondelez stock has underperformed. So what could Van de Put have in mind to shake things up and bring the company some adrenalin?

A full transcript follows the video.

10 stocks we like better than Mondelez InternationalWhen investing geniuses David and Tom Gardner have a stock tip, it can pay to listen. After all, the newsletter they have run for over a decade, Motley Fool Stock Advisor, has tripled the market.*

David and Tom just revealed what they believe are the 10 best stocks for investors to buy right now. and Mondelez International wasn&apost one of them! That&aposs right -- they think these 10 stocks are even better buys.

*Stock Advisor returns as of August 1, 2017

This podcast was recorded on Aug. 2, 2017.   

Chris Hill: Second-quarter results from Mondelez were overshadowed by the news thatꃎO Irene Rosenfeld is stepping down in November. She&aposs going to remain as਌hair of the company. Eleven years in the corner office for Irene Rosenfeld. It&aposs kind of interesting that Mondelez is bringing in an outsider, someone by the name of਍irk Van de Put, who&aposs਌oming over from McCain Foods. They&aposre਋ringing in an outsider, and that suggests to me that all is not well at the house of Oreo at Mondelez. If your thinking is "We need someਏresh perspective, and we&aposre going to bring in an outsider," I think that&aposs what this move telegraphs,ਊs opposed to "Everything&aposs been going so great for so long that we just need a top lieutenant to਌ome in and keep this steady ship afloat."

Bill Barker: It&aposs reasonably tough times in the packaged-food services sector, and Mondelez has not really escaped that and has not outperformed the competition. So I can see going in a new direction asꂾing one of the possible solutions, particularly over the last three years, it has not lived up to the competition. So you might be right about that. I haven&apost seen the details, and I&aposm sure they&aposre not saying anything like that,਋ut it&aposs been an underperforming stock for quite a long period of time. The house of Oreo, it&aposs a lot more than that. Maybe not to you.

Hill: It is the No. 1 cookie brand. I think --

Barker: Biscuit.

Hill: Biscuit?

Barker: Yeah, it&aposs in the biscuit division at Mondelez.

Hill: Maybe that&aposs part of their problem. You showed me a story earlier this morning online, and it was a still photograph of Irene Rosenfeld, and as you indicated, Mondelez has many brands under its umbrella, and the brand that was prominently featuredꂾhind Irene Rosenfeld was, in fact, Oreos. So that&aposs the one they&aposre most associated with.

Barker: Yeah. Certainly, it&aposs the one we talk about the most on this show, although Cadbury is probably a bigger part of the business, I believe. They&aposre the No. 1 or No. 2਌hocolate maker in every country,਎very major market in the world, except U.S. and China.

Hill: Is Hershey (NYSE: HSY) No.1 here in the States?

Barker: I believe Mars is No. 1.

Hill: Oh, yeah, that&aposs right.

Barker: I&aposm not entirely sure if it&aposs Mars or Hershey, but Mars possibly. I don&apost know about China, who&aposs No. 1. I know Hershey is not really competition around the rest of the world. It&aposs mostly Mars and�ury everywhere else.

Hill: So in terms of this new CEO coming in,ꂾyond looking at the cost structure in the Oreo division, which is, as we&aposve talked about before, incredibly bloated because they have way too many people working in the Oreo division, do you think that this new CEO is going to look to shed some of the brands that they have? Because that&aposs a strategy we&aposve seen from larger consumer-goods਌ompanies -- Procter & Gamble leaps to mind. But I&aposm thinking about the stock. They have some really strong brands under their umbrella. It&aposs kind of like whenਏord Motor had a record year in terms of sales and the stock went nowhere,ਊnd you could reasonably look at that and say, if you just sold the most vehicles you&aposve ever soldਊnd that&aposs not moving the stock, I&aposm not entirely sure what does. They have the No. 1 cookie brand. Do they need to start shedding some of these other under-performing brands in order to make this a stock worth owning?

Barker: Well,ꃎrtainly, getting rid of anything that&aposs not worth the investment makes sense. If you have new leadership coming in, they can look at things, and਎ven though there may be people who have been working on one specific brand for a long time, and you have a lot of entrenched interests, new eyes can come in and say, "Look,਌hiclets really aren&apost going to be worth doing for the next 50 years." I don&apost think Chiclets are in any danger, but that&aposs one of the many brands that they have. I don&apost know, when&aposs the last time you had some Chiclets?

Hill: I think I was a child. That&aposs how long ago it was.

Barker: Yeah. So I think the biggest brand introduction of late that they keep talking about is the Oreos brand chocolate that they&aposre selling now in the U.S., Oreos Milka, I guess. Have you ever heard of this?

Hill: No, never heard of this.

Barker: Let&aposs get you started on Oreos. You presented almost as fact that Oreos was this bloated division with way too many employees.

Hill: I&aposm waiting for proof that it&aposs not. Look, if you work in the Oreo division, you should be quaking in your boots that a new CEOਏrom a completely different company is going to be occupying the corner office,�use that&aposs one of the first things Dirk is going to do when he takes over. Like, "Show me the P&L on the Oreo਍ivision," because,ਊgain, it&aposs the No. 1 cookie in the world, and somehow this is a stock that&aposs gone nowhere for a year.

Barker: And your research into whether Oreos is a bloated division is going to grocery stores and getting angry at the number of choices of flavors that one can get with the Oreos brand now?

Hill: Exactly, way too many. Stop spending time and effort on these one-off insane flavor combinations. Just keep making the basic Oreos, the thin Oreos and Double Stuf. You can even talk me into the chocolate-filled ones as well. Butਏor crying out loud, stop with the Peeps. Just stop. Move on. You&aposve already got a hit. Move on to other divisions.

Barker: Was it Peeps, was that the straw that broke --

Hill: Yeah, Peeps was the straw that broke my back on that one.

Barker: And since then, you&aposre kind of inundated online with people researching these and sending them to Facebookਊnd the Twitter.

Hill: I appreciate them. I always appreciate the research.

Barker: Here&apossਊ little bit of anger for Chris Hill. Here&aposs a picture of some new insane Oreos਋rand.

Hill: It&aposs two things. One is, there&aposs no substitute for boots-on-the-ground research, so I always applaud that. Two, it signifies that I&aposm not the only one who thinks this way. It&aposs other people taking photos and tweeting them or posting them on Facebook and saying, "Oh my God, what are they doing over there?"

Barker: I don&apost know. if I were going to change something, I think I would change the name.

Hill: Of Oreos?

Barker: Mondelez.

Hill: Oh, yeah.

Barker: What is this?

Hill: Just਌hange it to Oreos. [laughs]

Barker: [laughs] But as a stock, it has under-performedਊny relevant period, most dramatically over the last year. Three, five, 10, 15 years against the S&P andਊgainst the confectioners it&aposs just not keeping up with the competition. They have a lot of well-known brands, and their playbook has been, "Let&aposs਎xtend those brands by combining Oreos with Peeps, or਌hips Ahoy with root beer flavor," or whatever they&aposre doing over there, and now Oreos Milka chocolate. So they&aposve acquired a few brands, and they paid outਊ bunch of dividends. That&aposs probably been aꂾtter use of their capital than some of the acquisitions. But I would agree with what appears to be the case that some new thinking is going to help.

Bill Barker has no position in any stocks mentioned. Chris Hill has no position in any stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends Facebook, Ford, and Twitter. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.


What It Means for Mondelez That CEO Irene Rosenfeld Is Leaving

In this Market Foolery segment, host Chris Hill and Motley Fool Funds&apos Bill Barkerਊttempt to read the tea leaves around the departure of Mondelez&aposs (NASDAQ: MDLZ) longtime CEO. Her replacement is Dirk Van de Put, the head of privately heldꃊnadian frozen-foods player McCain Foods. The packaged-foods segment as a whole has been doing tepidly in the past few years, and even within that, Mondelez stock has underperformed. So what could Van de Put have in mind to shake things up and bring the company some adrenalin?

A full transcript follows the video.

10 stocks we like better than Mondelez InternationalWhen investing geniuses David and Tom Gardner have a stock tip, it can pay to listen. After all, the newsletter they have run for over a decade, Motley Fool Stock Advisor, has tripled the market.*

David and Tom just revealed what they believe are the 10 best stocks for investors to buy right now. and Mondelez International wasn&apost one of them! That&aposs right -- they think these 10 stocks are even better buys.

*Stock Advisor returns as of August 1, 2017

This podcast was recorded on Aug. 2, 2017.   

Chris Hill: Second-quarter results from Mondelez were overshadowed by the news thatꃎO Irene Rosenfeld is stepping down in November. She&aposs going to remain as਌hair of the company. Eleven years in the corner office for Irene Rosenfeld. It&aposs kind of interesting that Mondelez is bringing in an outsider, someone by the name of਍irk Van de Put, who&aposs਌oming over from McCain Foods. They&aposre਋ringing in an outsider, and that suggests to me that all is not well at the house of Oreo at Mondelez. If your thinking is "We need someਏresh perspective, and we&aposre going to bring in an outsider," I think that&aposs what this move telegraphs,ਊs opposed to "Everything&aposs been going so great for so long that we just need a top lieutenant to਌ome in and keep this steady ship afloat."

Bill Barker: It&aposs reasonably tough times in the packaged-food services sector, and Mondelez has not really escaped that and has not outperformed the competition. So I can see going in a new direction asꂾing one of the possible solutions, particularly over the last three years, it has not lived up to the competition. So you might be right about that. I haven&apost seen the details, and I&aposm sure they&aposre not saying anything like that,਋ut it&aposs been an underperforming stock for quite a long period of time. The house of Oreo, it&aposs a lot more than that. Maybe not to you.

Hill: It is the No. 1 cookie brand. I think --

Barker: Biscuit.

Hill: Biscuit?

Barker: Yeah, it&aposs in the biscuit division at Mondelez.

Hill: Maybe that&aposs part of their problem. You showed me a story earlier this morning online, and it was a still photograph of Irene Rosenfeld, and as you indicated, Mondelez has many brands under its umbrella, and the brand that was prominently featuredꂾhind Irene Rosenfeld was, in fact, Oreos. So that&aposs the one they&aposre most associated with.

Barker: Yeah. Certainly, it&aposs the one we talk about the most on this show, although Cadbury is probably a bigger part of the business, I believe. They&aposre the No. 1 or No. 2਌hocolate maker in every country,਎very major market in the world, except U.S. and China.

Hill: Is Hershey (NYSE: HSY) No.1 here in the States?

Barker: I believe Mars is No. 1.

Hill: Oh, yeah, that&aposs right.

Barker: I&aposm not entirely sure if it&aposs Mars or Hershey, but Mars possibly. I don&apost know about China, who&aposs No. 1. I know Hershey is not really competition around the rest of the world. It&aposs mostly Mars and�ury everywhere else.

Hill: So in terms of this new CEO coming in,ꂾyond looking at the cost structure in the Oreo division, which is, as we&aposve talked about before, incredibly bloated because they have way too many people working in the Oreo division, do you think that this new CEO is going to look to shed some of the brands that they have? Because that&aposs a strategy we&aposve seen from larger consumer-goods਌ompanies -- Procter & Gamble leaps to mind. But I&aposm thinking about the stock. They have some really strong brands under their umbrella. It&aposs kind of like whenਏord Motor had a record year in terms of sales and the stock went nowhere,ਊnd you could reasonably look at that and say, if you just sold the most vehicles you&aposve ever soldਊnd that&aposs not moving the stock, I&aposm not entirely sure what does. They have the No. 1 cookie brand. Do they need to start shedding some of these other under-performing brands in order to make this a stock worth owning?

Barker: Well,ꃎrtainly, getting rid of anything that&aposs not worth the investment makes sense. If you have new leadership coming in, they can look at things, and਎ven though there may be people who have been working on one specific brand for a long time, and you have a lot of entrenched interests, new eyes can come in and say, "Look,਌hiclets really aren&apost going to be worth doing for the next 50 years." I don&apost think Chiclets are in any danger, but that&aposs one of the many brands that they have. I don&apost know, when&aposs the last time you had some Chiclets?

Hill: I think I was a child. That&aposs how long ago it was.

Barker: Yeah. So I think the biggest brand introduction of late that they keep talking about is the Oreos brand chocolate that they&aposre selling now in the U.S., Oreos Milka, I guess. Have you ever heard of this?

Hill: No, never heard of this.

Barker: Let&aposs get you started on Oreos. You presented almost as fact that Oreos was this bloated division with way too many employees.

Hill: I&aposm waiting for proof that it&aposs not. Look, if you work in the Oreo division, you should be quaking in your boots that a new CEOਏrom a completely different company is going to be occupying the corner office,�use that&aposs one of the first things Dirk is going to do when he takes over. Like, "Show me the P&L on the Oreo਍ivision," because,ਊgain, it&aposs the No. 1 cookie in the world, and somehow this is a stock that&aposs gone nowhere for a year.

Barker: And your research into whether Oreos is a bloated division is going to grocery stores and getting angry at the number of choices of flavors that one can get with the Oreos brand now?

Hill: Exactly, way too many. Stop spending time and effort on these one-off insane flavor combinations. Just keep making the basic Oreos, the thin Oreos and Double Stuf. You can even talk me into the chocolate-filled ones as well. Butਏor crying out loud, stop with the Peeps. Just stop. Move on. You&aposve already got a hit. Move on to other divisions.

Barker: Was it Peeps, was that the straw that broke --

Hill: Yeah, Peeps was the straw that broke my back on that one.

Barker: And since then, you&aposre kind of inundated online with people researching these and sending them to Facebookਊnd the Twitter.

Hill: I appreciate them. I always appreciate the research.

Barker: Here&apossਊ little bit of anger for Chris Hill. Here&aposs a picture of some new insane Oreos਋rand.

Hill: It&aposs two things. One is, there&aposs no substitute for boots-on-the-ground research, so I always applaud that. Two, it signifies that I&aposm not the only one who thinks this way. It&aposs other people taking photos and tweeting them or posting them on Facebook and saying, "Oh my God, what are they doing over there?"

Barker: I don&apost know. if I were going to change something, I think I would change the name.

Hill: Of Oreos?

Barker: Mondelez.

Hill: Oh, yeah.

Barker: What is this?

Hill: Just਌hange it to Oreos. [laughs]

Barker: [laughs] But as a stock, it has under-performedਊny relevant period, most dramatically over the last year. Three, five, 10, 15 years against the S&P andਊgainst the confectioners it&aposs just not keeping up with the competition. They have a lot of well-known brands, and their playbook has been, "Let&aposs਎xtend those brands by combining Oreos with Peeps, or਌hips Ahoy with root beer flavor," or whatever they&aposre doing over there, and now Oreos Milka chocolate. So they&aposve acquired a few brands, and they paid outਊ bunch of dividends. That&aposs probably been aꂾtter use of their capital than some of the acquisitions. But I would agree with what appears to be the case that some new thinking is going to help.

Bill Barker has no position in any stocks mentioned. Chris Hill has no position in any stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool owns shares of and recommends Facebook, Ford, and Twitter. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.


Watch the video: Mondelēz CEO Rosenfeld still thinks Trump could be good for US companies


Previous Article

Thermomix tender cake

Next Article

The Rice Krispies Treat Goes Postmodern